Johnny Manziel Scheme

BY THYRAN NOWDEN

I disliked how the media reacted about the Johnny Manziel scheme. I feel that the media blew the whole situation out of proportion in trying to defend Manziel. They could have approached the Johnny Manziel situation in a more negative way to let the viewer’s know what Manziel did was not a good thing.

The media should have spoken more about how Manziel was wrong for signing autographs to make money and less about how he won the Heisman the previous football season.

The media was so focused on how Johnny Manziel was the best player in college football that it overshadowed him being punished for signing autographs for money.

If the media would have spoke more about Manziel being punished and that what he did was not acceptable, the viewers would be more interested in learning about the rules and regulations of college football. More people would realize that signing autographs to make extra money is illegal and if a player does commit some type of illegal action they should be punished.

People would finally understand that college athlete’s participation in illegal activities is a serious problem in college sports.

The media wanted to protect Manziel because he won the Heisman and since Texas A&M was one of the best teams in college football.

I feel that it is unfair that the media didn’t want to elaborate on why Manziel participated in the scheme and how he should be punished for what he did. This is a perfect example of how celebrities get preferential treatment.

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About The Richard A. Maxwell Sport Media Project

The Richard A. Maxwell Sport Media Project is a hub for teaching, research, and service related to sport media. The Project benefits students and faculty at Bowling Green State University, and offers outreach and media consulting to area and regional groups that work with student-athletes. Through collaborative efforts of the Sport Management program and the School of Media and Communication, BGSU students have the opportunity to learn such skills as sports writing, reporting, broadcasting, announcing, public relations, media relations, communication management and production. Faculty and other scholars have access to resources about the commercial and sociological aspects of sport.

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