Cameras and commentators shine at Masters

BY MATTHEW OSTROW

The coverage of the 2012 Masters golf tournament was very well done with great commentary, beautiful camera work and great analysis.

Augusta is a beautiful course that was displayed well by different angles and fly-by shots.  Throughout the tournament, there were good visuals showing the different holes and what the difficulties of each hole are.  The cameras also did a fine job of showcasing the emotions of each golfer.  After Bubba Watson missed a key putt in the playoff,  the camera had a great angle showing him discussing what went wrong with his caddy.  Golf is a hard sport to showcase on television since the field of play is so large. However,  close-ups of the individual golfers are also needed. CBS did an amazing job showcasing both of those elements.

Along with the camera work, there was informative analysis from all the commentators.  Jim Nantz did a majority of the commentary.  He set the stage well and even spoke softly while the golfer was about to swing.  Nantz kept viewers very informed with every detail of the tournament.

The whole coverage of the Masters by CBS really fit golf and the tournament. The Masters is arguably the best golf tournament in the world and the coverage did a fantastic job with such an important and entertaining event.

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About The Richard A. Maxwell Sport Media Project

The Richard A. Maxwell Sport Media Project is a hub for teaching, research, and service related to sport media. The Project benefits students and faculty at Bowling Green State University, and offers outreach and media consulting to area and regional groups that work with student-athletes. Through collaborative efforts of the Sport Management program and the School of Media and Communication, BGSU students have the opportunity to learn such skills as sports writing, reporting, broadcasting, announcing, public relations, media relations, communication management and production. Faculty and other scholars have access to resources about the commercial and sociological aspects of sport.

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