Lousy NBA Slam Dunk Contest given life by commentators

BY ANTHONY ALFORD

The NBA’s Slam Dunk Contest went from Jordan/Wilkins in the 80s, to Vinsanity (Vince Carter) in 2000, to Ross/Evans in 2013. I doubt many even knew of Terrence Ross or Jeremy Evans prior to this year’s Slam Dunk Contest.

The contest, by many standards was a snoozer. But the TNT crew of Charles Barkley, Kenny Smith, Shaq, and Kevin Harlan managed to make it entertaining.

The broadcast team took a “tell it like it is” approach to their telecast. Barkley and Shaq routinely noted the lack of playing time the players involved get on their respective teams. Some may argue it took away from these players’ moment of glory, but the comedy used in their commentary kept viewers watching. Barkley mocked comedian Kevin Hart, the attire worn by high-ups, and asked his TNT bosses to pay LeBron James to be in next year’s contest. The commentators understood their viewers did not want serious basketball talk all the time and let their personalities shine.

The TNT crew did their best to entertain their audience and tried to treat the event like a big deal. But, no matter how well an event is covered, if the event itself is crap, then it’s still crap.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , on by .

About The Richard A. Maxwell Sport Media Project

The Richard A. Maxwell Sport Media Project is a hub for teaching, research, and service related to sport media. The Project benefits students and faculty at Bowling Green State University, and offers outreach and media consulting to area and regional groups that work with student-athletes. Through collaborative efforts of the Sport Management program and the School of Media and Communication, BGSU students have the opportunity to learn such skills as sports writing, reporting, broadcasting, announcing, public relations, media relations, communication management and production. Faculty and other scholars have access to resources about the commercial and sociological aspects of sport.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s